27

It all has to do with how tracert works. Ping is straight ICMP from point A to point B, that traverses networks via routing rules. Tracert works very different, even though it uses ICMP. Tracert works by targeting the final hop, but limiting the TTL and waiting for a time exceeded message, and then increasing it by one for the next iteration. Therefore, the ...


18

The line 89-75-22-81.infra.chello.pl at the top of the traceroute suggests you are using a cable connection. Chello is a brand formerly used by UPC, a cable internet service provider. The appearance of an IP address in a private range immediately after your local network is normal for cable connections. The address 10.216.128.1 belongs to a cable modem ...


11

it seems like you are having a bit of a hard time getting what Frank Thomas is saying. Assuming you are at host A. If you want to get to host D you need to go through both routers B and C. B and C, both have interfaces on the public network (155.10.30.1 and 132.277.62.1 respectively). However, their internal routing network is allocated by private space. ...


10

You can never be sure when it comes to traceroute results. But there is hope for your special case. The contract says the servers are in the EU. There is a test you can execute which, if successful, would give you 100% guarantee that they are lying. (if unsuccessful, they might be telling the truth, or they might be lying) The idea is to use something like ...


9

I guess the best solution is to go to dnsleaktest and click on Standard test. I use this method personally all the time.


9

each router interface should be in different subnet? The error in your logic lies in the assumption that network topologies always involve routers which strictly pass packets received on an interface in one subnetwork out via an interface defined in a different subnetwork. While that is true in common SOHO and medium-enterprise environments, it is not the ...


8

Windows queries DNS in this order: Hosts file Local DNS cache Preferred DNS servers Other DNS servers (Secondary, Tertiary, ...) You can find out more about this behavior over at Microsoft (How DNS query works, Client features). Additionally, there's also a list of timeouts for DNS requests: Value Default Value Attempt -----------------------------...


7

There's two reasons for it. 1) A timeout. Although usually you'll eventually get replies in one of the rtt positions like 70 * * or something. 2) Some routers are configured to block some parts of the ICMP protocol from working (ICMP echo to be precise). This is usually to help prevent DDOS attacks etc. Traceroute depends on ICMP echo working. ...


7

108.162.198.181 as compared to 108.162.198.81 ^^^


7

Not every ip address on your tracert has to be a public IP. It might be a router or server on one of the internal nodes of an ISP that you went through on the way to your destination.


7

The nslookup command from command prompt will tell you which one it is using (typically your primary). Sometimes typing in a fake domain (hdhsgdh.com) will fail on the first dns server and attempt to use the second. A quick edit: don't type an address after The nslookup command, it will tell you which dns server it is using.


7

Traceroute works by sending out IP packets with successively higher IP TTL (time to live) values: 1,2,3... Each hop decrements the TTL. When it reaches 0, the packet is not routed, and an ICMP time exceeded message is sent to to the source, which is how the system running traceroute determines the route. This appears to be the traceroute version found on ...


7

Your supposition is right : tracert was introduced in the DOS operating system, dating from 1981 and in heavy use until 1995, when Windows applications took over. DOS used the 8.3 filename, so "traceroute.exe" was just too long for an executable file-name. The same also happened to other Linux/UNIX utilities. I searched the question a bit more because of ...


6

Using UDP for traceroute is considered by some poor practice, because UDP is supposed to be a data-carrying application protocol. ICMP ECHO_REQUEST is the preferred method, though there is no standard. The main reason to use ICMP is that UDP can carry a payload, so allowing it through a firewall has greater security implications; for the end-user it's more ...


6

If you are being routed through a slow link on the public Internet, pretty much your only options are to forcibly route yourself around it. The simplest way to do this is to attempt a file transfer between two endpoints, one of them being "point A" (the origin of the data) and an intermediate site that is not geographically co-located with your destination, "...


6

Tracert works by sending packets addressed to the target host, but with a TTL set to the next expected hop count (eg its first packest are TTL=0, then TTL=1, etc). when TTL=0, the first router will return a ICMP TTL Exceeded message to the host using its own IP as sender, and drop the packet. That TTL Exceeded message is what tracert pays attention to when ...


6

The program is looking at argv[0] (its name) and invoking different behavior based on which command (tracert or traceroute) you're using. If you execute the program tracert then argv[0] is tracert. So two commands, same executable, different paths through the code invoking different behavior. On Ubuntu Linux: traceroute6 is equivalent to traceroute -6 ...


6

No, there is nothing to fix as regards your traceroute. First, the only devices on that list that are NOT routers are the first and the last. Every hop represents a router. Some of these routers may not be in public address space, in which case they couldn't display a name for the hop. Since you have hops after hop 6, this cannot be contributing to any ...


6

They should be the same. Here is what I found: Both commands are basically the same thing. The main difference is of the Operating System and how the command is implemented in the background.On the foreground you see the same kind of information in both cases. Traceroute is a computer network diagnostic tool, displaying the route and measuring ...


5

I am not aware of any easy way built in to Windows to track this information. However, a utility such as Wireshark makes it fairly easy to track your network traffic and filter by specific kinds of traffic, such as DNS.


5

The output from traceroute shows you each 'hop' between the source host (where you issued the command) and the destination host (the one specified on the commandline). for each hop, it will show the distance (number of hops), the IP address and/or associated hostname (hostname determined using reverse resolution), and the delay / latency between the source ...


4

traceroute should be fairly indicative since it is the path your traffic takes to get to your server. If the last router it hits is in New York it might be far more likely that it is located there. Perform one and check the IP addresses that are reported along the way. Currently my public IP address puts me in a location nowhere near where I am actually ...


4

First of all your two commands are sending packets with different destination IP addresses. That means they may take different routes. When you see 66.249.95.234 on the route towards 216.58.220.100, you might assume that packets with the destination address 66.249.95.234 would be using the same route until reaching that point. That is however not a valid ...


4

Can you ping a VoIP telephone number? I'm interested in doing so, so that I can get the IP address and do a trace route. No, that is generally not possible. If the caller is using a VoIP provider that proxies the call (which is most providers), then the IP address of the provider will be available. Simplified Explanation: The caller's VoIP device can ...


4

Ping command, ping [1],[2], is the basic tool that sends a package to the destination and waits for the answer. In the output it shows the delays ( min/avg/max/mdev ). You can ping different ports too. You can ping different port too with other programs (see below). Among the many options you can select -p to specify the packet you send, useful for ...


4

Traceroute works by sending pings with increasing Time To Lives, and watching the address the responses come from. By default the windows firewall drops inbound ping requests, so traceroute to the windows box won't work either, as it uses them to trace the route to the remote machine. By default, Windows Firewall does not allow incoming ICMP Echo messages ...


4

That's not necessarily the last node. The issue here is that once mtr gets the first set of replies, it doesn't update the number of rows anymore. The first path that was seen had 17 hops, but later it changed to 18 or 19 or 20. (In general, mtr's interface is completely unsuitable for displaying traces which take multiple completely different paths. Even ...


3

There are two PTR records for that IP address: $ dig -x 82.195.128.132 ... ;; ANSWER SECTION: 132.128.195.82.in-addr.arpa. 3584 IN PTR mail.hosting365.ie. 132.128.195.82.in-addr.arpa. 3584 IN PTR ns1.hosting365.ie. Interestingly, this has changed since I've been writing! I now see only 132.128.195.82.in-addr.arpa. 3479 IN PTR mail.hosting365.ie.


3

"Desktop" in this case is relative path. You should change to right folder ("cd" command) or put the whole path to output file in the .bat file.


3

Actually you're probably not seeing a block, a block would be there permanently, you are probably seeing some routing problems between your ISP (or their provider) and the network you need to reach. If it were your ISP, you'd be seeing the traffic dropped much sooner. Notice the traffic gets to somewhere in Germany from the last tinet, it goes to Dusseldorf, ...


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