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88

Another way to check whether you are using a USB 3.0 connection or not is to use USBView.exe from Windows Driver Kit (WDK) You could also use USB Device Tree Viewer, which is very similar to USBView.exe and you won't have to download the huge WDK to use it. When you run USB Device Tree Viewer, you'll see a list of USB Host Controllers (there are 3 on my ...


37

Yes, it's safe. The base connector is identical to the original Micro-B, only adding the USB 3.0 data send/receive lines on the side. (USB 3.0 is backwards-compatible with 2.0, and this applies equally to all connectors it introduced – both the full-size and micro-size, type-A and type-B ports). The end result will generally be the same as if connecting the ...


36

Actually, I'm surprised the first anwer is accepted and upvoted without any facts whatsoever to support the statement, as it's most probably a wrong one. Both MIDI drums and MIDI keyboard are almost certainly low-speed devices, so they will consume less than 1% of bandwith from a high-speed hub at most (2*1 Mbit/s / 480 Mbit/s * 100% = 0.4%). ...


23

The short answer is you really want a Multi-TT hub for this application, where 2 or more of your USB devices are likely 12 Mbit/sec. Search for "Multi-TT" on Amazon, Newegg or other sites to find these hubs. Unfortunately, this important technical detail is rarely mentioned. Most hubs use a cheaper Single-TT design. The good Multiple TT ones are rarely ...


21

This doesn’t make sense to me. Is there any reason for this? I noticed this as well when I upgraded my Mac Mini to a model with USB 3.0 ports on it; my older USB 2.0 drives would copy data noticeably faster. The logic I believe is not all USB 2.0 controllers are the same. The way I understand it, USB 2.0 speed is spec’ed to be a max speed; not a ...


18

Although this is not a software solution, if you use a USB 2 extension cable then it will prevent the 5 USB 3 pins in the plug from physically connecting the wires which carry the USB 3 handshake between the host and device. A USB 2 device or cable only has 4 pins. A USB 3 port will default to USB 2 signaling communication when only 4 pins are connected. A ...


11

Yes, and no, with a small caveat. Generally, this will work, and is perfectly safe (albeit considerably slower than using an USB 3 cable). However, note that some disks require use too much power for USB 2.0 to be sufficient. While the amount of power that you can draw from USB 3 is quite amazing, USB 2.0 is kinda puny in that respect. There are disks ...


9

The reason USB 2.0 is practically limited to roughly 50% if it's rated speed (20-30MB/s vs. 60MB/s) is that is not full-duplex, thus every data packet which comes to the host (PC) will need another packet to the device (HDD), effectively limiting the speed to ½ of the theoretical 480MBit/s. Since USB 3.0 has not only much higher rated transfer speeds, but ...


7

TLDR: Try using USB over IP instead of USB2 over USB3. A quick googling shows that your exact question is not possible. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USB_hub#Transaction_translator Any USB 2.0 hub that supports a higher standard than USB 1.1 (12 Mbit/s) will translate between the lower standard and the higher standard using what is called a transaction ...


5

In Device Manager, right-click the USB drive in the Disk drives category, then select Properties, switch to Policies tab, and choose "Optimize for performance". Click OK to keep it. Note: If you use this method, make sure you use the "Safely remove hardware" icon that appears in the notification area when you plug in the device (the notification area is the ...


4

Why you can't rely on extending a USB 3.0 cable at all. USB 3.0 + USB 2.0 Cables There are a number of existing answers that explain how the USB 3.0 cable contains additional wires specific to USB 3.0 high-speed communication, so you can't use a USB 2.0 cable to extend a USB 3.0 connection and retain the speed. Full-length USB 3.0 cables + hub Jcordeiro's ...


4

Just my case as an example of USB 3.0 HUB slowing down when more than one device connected to it. I have two identical sets of: SataIII to USB3.1 Gen2 Type C Enclosure with a 480GB SSD. If i put the SSD in a SataIII port, Linux dd command reads at more than 500MiB/s. If i put the SSD in the SataIII to USB 3.1 Gen2 Type C enclosure, Linux dd command reads ...


4

Realistically, sharing a single USB port by using a hub to expand how many devices you plug in is probably not going to matter too much even if you use all of the devices attached simultaneously. Most devices won't be using very much of the data transfer at a time. It's even less of a concern if you're using USB 3.0 or 3.1 ports, which are 10 and 20 times ...


4

If you still have the problem with poor data-transfer rates on Toshiba's USB 3.0 port(s) (in my case), just disable USB Legacy Emulation in BIOS. Even if the USB 3.0 controller is enabled in BIOS, the user always will get maximum 33-34MB/s against 77-85MB/s when legacy mode is off. This solution probably will work on other brands with USB legacy devices ...


4

It's possible. It involves changing configuration registers in the xHCI controller, so it's obviously chipset-specific. This is how it's done on Linux. I suppose it should be possible to do it on Windows too, but I don't know what utility to use. To set both ports to USB 2.0 mode: sudo setpci -H1 -d 8086:1e31 d8.l=0 Right port 3.0 and left port 2.0: sudo ...


4

The USB power specifications clearly specify that a single USB2.0 port can deliver a maximum of 500mA worth of current at 5V: that's 2.5 Watts. Any electrical device, including an external DVD drive, must list it's maximum power draw so as long as you're beneath 2.5W you will be fine. Link to USB wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USB#Power


4

@AliChen seems to be on the right path, actually this is a good line of thinking I hadn't considered. I never checked the motherboard specs when I posted my comment. This board uses a NEC (now Renesas) D720200F1 USB chipset for it's USB 3.0 ports, which seems to need a firmware update for full compatibility with published USB 3.0 standards, more information ...


4

Yes I can verify this works as I have tested this myself. I have done this exact same thing with a WD Elements 2TB USB3 portable hard drive and multiple decent quality USB2 micro B cables without problems. But indeed it will be at USB2 speeds.


3

You're already using that drive at its maximum performance. USB 2.0 maximum throughput is 480 Mbps (lowercase 'b' - megabits per second) and you're getting 30 MBps out of it (uppercase 'B' - megabytes per second). 1 MB = 8 Mb, so USB 2.0's theoretical throughput is 60 MBps. But USB can't work with full duplex, and that means it's 60 MBps in both directions ...


3

USB 3.0 gives you 900ma vs 500ma of power. If you copy data from 2 usb devices the same time to your hard drive they WILL have to share the 25-30mb/s that USB 2.0 has available. The only way you benefit from USB 3.0 is if you have a USB 3.0 port on your computer and a USB 3.0 hub all devices will get a dramatic speed boost otherwise no. Even then the USB ...


3

A USB 3.0 device has 9 pins, with 4 of them used for USB 2.0 compatibility. When you plug in a USB 2.0 device into a 3.0 socket, the lack of the other 5 pins signals the control that it is a USB 2.0 device, and uses the slower transfer protocol.


3

A lot of USB pen drives just have slow write speeds. It's a hardware limitation of the flash memory they're using and there is really nothing you can do about it. All the suggestions like write caching or different formatting typically will only give marginal gains in cases like this - where the (external) device's internal speed is simply low compared to ...


3

Check your BIOS settings! Typically, you access your BIOS settings shortly after you turn on your PC by pressing the DEL key. Sometimes, this is the F2 key (like for most Dell's) or possibly something else. Once in the BIOS, you may have a setting related to USB compatibility and it could be that it's now set to "Legacy" mode which maxes out at something ...


3

Unfortunately, no. When the host is communicating with one device (at USB 2 speeds), the rest of the devices need to wait their turn. Since all devices cannot communicate faster than USB 2, then you have a USB 2 network with one host capable of faster speeds (but cannot use it). It is the same with using a 1 GB network card with a 10 MB network card; it ...


3

Check if other devices are working on this port. If not you may need to install drivers for USB3.0. If yes then check the drive on all other 3.0 ports. The ports sometimes develop mechanical fault and do not provide sufficient power for the drive to work, but will not have problem with powering a mouse, for example, or work with a printer.


3

This guy provides a solution that seems to work for some people. In my case, I've tried it and it changed nothing, but it's very hardware-dependant. The uvcvideo kernel module can be set to ignore the requested bandwidth, and to calculate the right bandwidth. Try: sudo rmmod uvcvideo sudo modprobe uvcvideo quirks=128 This will be reset every reboot. If ...


3

Because of the discussion here, I need to remark that the poster is correct and a USB 2.0 bandwidth limit does exist, as distinct from USB 3.0 bandwidth. Wikipedia USB has this to say : Because there are two separate controllers in each USB 3.0 host, USB 3.0 devices transmit and receive at USB 3.0 data rates regardless of USB 2.0 or earlier devices ...


3

Thing is in most cases it won't matter, usb 3.0 or 2.0, they will both work. But problems may occur. For example when I tried to unlock bootloader on my HTC One M7, I didn't work with usb 3.0 port, it had to be 2.0. So yes, in 99,5% it really won't matter, but if you might operate with some a bit older devices on software level, you might want to get at ...


3

The effect of static electricity from your body being discharge through an electronic device can be profound. USB Flash Drives are built to limit the effects of Electrostatic Discharge but are not foolproof. In low humidity conditions, generating static electricity by shuffling across a rug and plugging any device into the USB port can destroy both the ...


3

Type-C specifications define the new connector form-factor, which includes receptacle, plug, and a set of various cables. It is designed to serve all USB protocols, and is not a subject of whether it is possible on not. Just as a Type-A host receptacle can carry USB2-only connection (which is indistinguishable from USB3 receptacle except its color, which is ...


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