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78

The Wikipedia page Mains electricity by country doesn't list any countries with 250 V mains. That's probably socket's max voltage rating. It doesn't mean actual voltage is 250 V. 16 A is max current rating. Electricity sources don't "push" current into devices, but rather devices pull as much current as they need (and the source can provide). Please note ...


55

In most motherboard cables there is a little triangle that marks the positive side. See the picture below:


32

Laptop batteries have a small chip inside that controls/monitors the charging process and also monitors the number of charge/recharge cycles. This chip is factory programmed with information how this sort of battery typically degrades over time. It also can derive information from the charging cycle itself: The time it takes to reach full-charge at a ...


21

It's unlikely it was a placebo, if you felt it well enough to be able to say things like the path it took through your body. I certainly don't wish to worsen your fears (though honestly, a little more fear or respect concerning electricity is probably a good thing, it's easy to become complacent, I could probably stand to use more caution at times myself), ...


17

There are two parts to this question. The first part questions the labeling of the plug, and the second, the labeling of the computer power supply. As to the plug: (16A) This is the receptacle rating. The receptacle must operate safety when this amount of current is passing though it. It can be used for any current below this maximum safely. (250V) The ...


11

Type-C original specifications (and Power Delivery specifications over Type-C connector, if any) are designed precisely for the sake of compatibility and inter-operability. Since both Type-C devices come from reputable manufacturers, I would expect that they are compliant to all related specifications, and no harm will be done to any of your devices. The ...


8

The card itself is an 5740 IBM 03N5444 Quad Port 10/100/1000 Base-TX Ethernet PCI-X Ethernet Adapter which IBM states is a PCI-X 1.0a adapter that operates at 3.3 volts. The motherboard itself is an HP P5LP-LE (Leonite) which has only PCI slots. More details from the manual itself here: There are three 32-bit PCI slots on this motherboard. The slots ...


6

Micron have an interesting Tech note where they say the following: Micron 1.35V DDR3L and DDR3L-RS devices use the same die as 1.5V DDR3 devices, but have been separated during the test screen and marking process. The Micron 1.35V test screen incorporates testing to ensure backward compatibility to 1.5V operation. Therefore, all parts marked as DDR3L or ...


6

The issue is specific to certain Haswell-based system configurations. Haswell introduced new, extremely low-power states called C6 and C7. The processor virtually shuts down in these power states, placing loads as low as 0.05A on the +12V rails. Since it's usually only high-power devices such as the processor and graphics card that draw power from the +12V ...


6

Quick explanation This image seems to point to the internal plates being connected internally, with the outside as a 0v line In depth explanation As the two plates are connected, which plate is on which side shouldn't matter, as they are directly connected to each other. This can best be explained with the following diagram: Black is 0v, red is 20v, ...


5

It depends on the laptop but laptop batteries are rather smart. They can calculate how long they can last and how much their capacity is lost because of usage and aging. If your 5 year old laptop just reported that you should consider replacing it, then you are lucky, as a battery's life is 3 years average. By the way if your computer is 5 years old, I ...


5

50mV is the acceptable limit for ripple on all lines but the 12V line (per the ATX specification), so that would include the 3.3V line. Every device that draws power off the line has its own protection against ripple up to the permitted limit, so there's no reason it should cause a problem.


5

Nearly all computer power supply units (PSUs) are switched mode power supplies (SMPS). The mode of operation is: Rectify the mains voltage. Charge a high voltage capacitor to mains peak voltage. Feed the DC through a ferrite transformer and high-voltage switching transistor. Switch the transistor at high frequency. This generates an AC on the primary which ...


4

Unless you are trying to get your 24-pin motherboard to boot from a 20-pin power cable you really don't have much to worry about besides having the proper connector. Available connectors off a PSU: 24-pin power cable for modern motherboards (~6 years old or newer) 4-pin and/or 8-pin auxiliary power for high-end motherboards that overclock like mad or ...


4

The PLL voltage setting determines the voltage fed to the CPU's phase locked loop section. The phase locked loop section generates the clock signals for different parts of the CPU that are clocked at different frequencies. It generates the main core clock, the video clock (if the CPU has a video controller), the memory controller clock, the bus clocks, and ...


4

As documented here, the VCCPLL should be 1.80V +/- 5% and is specified at a max of 1.5A, which means it draws a maximum power of 2.835W. Since this is such a very low number compared to the >77W (stock, yours is probably higher) that the whole CPU draws, it will not provide significant power usage reductions. Of course you can experiment, but even if you ...


4

I would not mis-match voltages. When the System turns on it should detect the voltages and adjust correctly. Not all RAM and motherboards handle this equally well. But if they are mismatched on the on the same channel especially you might not have RAM detected properly, or it might be unstable or not boot. I would expect at least an unstable environment. ...


4

You have multiple ATA and/or SATA power connectors coming out of your PSU, no? All of their 12 volt pins come from the same rail. "How can they provide howevermany separate 12V pins?" Easy: All those pins are connected via individual wires to a common connection point back in the PSU. The reason this is done is that there is a limit on how much current ...


4

That means your power supply failure. For different voltage, is provide power for different hardware component, so it doesnt matter if 5V and 12V is stable, your computer will still reboot when 3.3V is too low. +3.3V: PCI device、mainboard、agp display(legacy) +5V: HDD、DVD rom drive、floppy drive(legacy)、PCI device、USB/firewire/KB/mouse、mainboard、ram、agp ...


4

While a fresh alkaline cell would typically have an open circuit reading of a little more than 1.5v leading to a series pair producing more than 3v, this would never be as high as 3.7v in practice. You'll also find that your 3.7v cell is actually closer to 4.2v when fully charged. Although it's possible that the designers of your mouse used ICs with a ...


4

The simple answer is this: Your laptop can be charged using this socket Switches/sockets list the maximum current and the maximum voltage they can support without burning out (i.e. - safely and without causing damage to themselves or the attached devices). The laptop consumes lesser current than the maximum rating of the socket. On a side note, most ...


4

Yes, as long as the voltage is the same and amperage is more than required, the laptop charger will work (assuming the plugs fit)


4

Assuming they're both genuine Lenovo chargers with the same connector, the answer is most likely yes. Case in point: my HP ENVY x360 13 shipped with a 45W adapter. It'll charge on a separately-purchased HP 65W adapter, with the higher output allowing it to charge faster than the 45W adapter when the laptop is in use. It'll also charge from any USB Power ...


3

The boards will not provide 2 different voltages for 2 different dimm modules. Low voltage dimms are designed to use less power, work really well doing so. From an overclockers perspective , they would hit it with 1.5v without flinching. I am not reccomending using things out of spec, just indicating it probably is not a big issue in this situation. You ...


3

The short answer is this: Signal integrity is hard, and the rule of thumb higher frequency should require higher voltage is not the whole picture. There are lots of factors that go into high-frequency signal integrity and without looking at the actual failures at an electrical level, it can be very difficult to determine what the actual cause is. Off the ...


3

For the proprietary driver (AMD Catalyst / fglrx), there are only two utilities I'm aware of: ATI Overclock AMDOverdriveCtrl If these tools do not function correctly, or do not allow you to overclock, you are probably out of luck. The proprietary driver does not easily give up its secrets; these tools are a "best effort" attempt by the open source ...


3

I do not know of ANY DDR3 1.35V memory which will not work at 1.5V. 1.5V memory is not guaranteed to operate to specs at 1.35V. 1.35V memory IS guaranteed to operate to specs at 1.5V. This is made plain by surveying the component specification datasheets for DDR3 and DDR3L memory devices. See also: 1.35 V RAM in a 1.5 V system - Will it fry or overclock?


3

Your 1.2V rechargeable battery should work perfectly well. An alkaline battery starts of with a terminal voltage somewhere between 1.5 - 1.6 Vdc which decays as the battery is discharged. End of life is a terminal voltage somewhere between 0.7 - 1.0 Vdc (depends on the equipment using the battery). Your 1.2V rechargeable cell starts off with a terminal ...


3

A regular consumer-grade USV is driven by a single phase. So no, that’s not possible. A single phase of your 3-phase 208v provides ~120 Volt, which is the standard mains voltage only in North America, some parts of South America, & Japan. Almost everywhere else uses 220 - 240v, for which it would not be suitable.


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