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34

This is expected as you are capturing the traffic before it enters the VPN tunnel i.e. before it is encrypted.


11

I had similar issues with Cisco AnyConnect. I think WSL1 does it's networking through Windows (via Hyper-V?) and WSL2 is effectively a Linux Kernel running virtualised alongside Windows. My fix was In Windows ipconfig /all get the DNS values for the VPN adaptor In WSL sudo vi /etc/resolv.conf and add the DNS values as lines nameserver <DNS IP> You ...


8

I used ubuntu_20 and WSL2 and I did the following steps to fix the issue: Run Powershell as administrator Get-NetAdapter | Where-Object {$_.InterfaceDescription -Match "Cisco AnyConnect"} | Set-NetIPInterface -InterfaceMetric 4000 Get-NetIPInterface -InterfaceAlias "vEthernet (WSL)" | Set-NetIPInterface -InterfaceMetric 1 Find ...


7

VPN doesn't affect the security of websites that use HTTPS. Nowadays most of the websites do use it. You can check this by clicking the padlock icon next to the address bar and reading the message that will appear. It should say something like "Connection secure" (exact message and visuals depend on the browser you're using). HTTPS offers full ...


4

Presentation Here's an answer requiring minimal support from the server itself, but multiple routing tweaks on the WireGuard server and especially on the VPS. I chose to keep OP's setup in place, including keeping the WireGuard tunnel between the VPS and the WGserver. Proper integration of the configuration to the specific distribution(s) in use won't be ...


3

As previous solutions and comments have pointed out, activating a wireguard (WG) tunnel is not possible - the action requires privilege elevation of some kind. The solutions mentioned so far have some downsides, at least in my use case. For completeness I'll list all solutions mentioned and add mine. Normal WG installation, switch to administrator user to ...


3

For Linux with iptables, something along the lines of: iptables -A OUTPUT -m statistic --mode random --probability 0.02 -j DROP or iptables -A INPUT -m statistic --mode random --probability 0.02 -j DROP Notes: The above commands affect all packets processed by the OUTPUT (or INPUT respectively) chain of the filter table. You will probably want to use -p (...


3

So first, i'd like to know how does the virtual interface utun0 gets its packets - Perhaps it uses specific port ? The VPN client (or server) “owns” the interface. Similar to how a real network interface is backed by hardware and a physical connection, the virtual network interface is backed by software. Anything that enters the interface (outgoing traffic) ...


3

Your question is a little unclear, but I'll give a broad overview. My apologies if this gets just a bit political, but I think its neccessary to explain properly. A VPN works by encrypting all traffic between the VPN endpoints - thus A correctly set up VPN of OK quality should bypass all restrictions if it can make a connection to an endpoint on the other ...


3

SSH tunneling and MAC filtering is usually safe enough. SSH tunneling is safely encrypted, and for MAC filtering to be spoofed the hacker needs to know your MAC address to start with. A VPN requires that one side in the connection has installed a VPN server, and the other side a VPN client. This adds some complications and may not be feasible for some types ...


3

One of my friends helped me solve this issue with the help of zx2c4 (Jason Donenfeld) from WireGuard. I am sharing our solution here for the next person with this same problem. WireGuard for Windows added support for Table = off in v0.3.15. This makes it so WireGuard does not update the routing table when the tunnel is opened. At this point we have a tunnel ...


2

You can put your connection info in a separate file, e.g. anyconnect.txt: connect [HOST] [GROUP or 0 or 1] [USER] [PASSWORD] y exit And then do: /opt/cisco/anyconnect/bin/vpn -s < anyconnect.txt


2

If you're on a Mac and Wireshark can't capture the traffic, you can use the MacOS version of tcpdump with the special iptap interface option you can capture traffic e.g. if your VPN is using tun1 sudo tcpdump -i iptap,tun1


2

You don't need to run some other VPN through ssh. you can use ssh AS the VPN. see ssh's "-w X:Y" option. This is a linux-centric answer. Presume a server, we'll call it "hub", to which ssh tunnel clients connect. They will use 172.17.2.0/24 as the VPN "carrier" network. Certain hosts are common and well known, we give them fixed ...


2

Wireguard 3.1+ now supports non-admins running wireguard, but you'll need to do some minor modifications: https://lore.kernel.org/wireguard/X7vGOb0o6SHIvfDc@zx2c4.com/T/#u Install wireguard 3.1+ Add your user to the "Network Operators Group". Open up explorer as admin right click "My Computer" > "Manage" > "Users/...


2

What you want is quite do-able and likely within your reach. I am speaking from experience. Your Sonic Wall very likely offers VPN via the Net Extender Client. This can be set up to access your server. The client app needs to be installed on the person(s) computers and, yes, they need to take the computers home. Hopefully some are laptops already. ...


2

I found this on the internet years ago, have lost the original source link. A computer uses a "routing table" to decide where to send it's data packets. In XP/Vista, you can see your routing table by using the following command inside the cmd shell: netstat -R You'll see many lines but scan through them and the only one that is of interest is the ...


2

I think you are mixing technologies. VPN's can be used to securely connect to company's networks and encrypts the traffic. As well as using a VPN obscuricate where you are coming from, tricking services to believe you are in a different place, by getting the IP of the VPN provider. IE tricking television services into thinking you are in NY when say you are ...


2

You're correct that public CAs will only issue certificates to public domain names (as that's what they're able to verify). However, you're missing that this doesn't necessarily have anything to do with whether the server is publicly accessible or not, nor even with whether it has a public IP address or not. The server does not have to be public in order to ...


2

As we've discussed, the issue is that when you are at your friends house, your local network (the friends) and your remote network (your LAN at home) use the same IP network (192.168.0.0/24). A VPN Tunnel is not magic. At its most basic, they are formed of packets containing an encrypted payload, which is a packet that is passing through the "tunnel&...


2

It depends a lot on the protocol used by the VPN. Even counting just the ones considered "more or less standard" will give you a dozen or so. Almost all enterprise VPN systems use their own proprietary thing. And if you include the various commercial VPN apps, even more. However, nearly all modern data encryption protocols generate a new "...


2

Security is fine with most any VPN. Privacy? Be careful which VPN provider you decide to use; research their history and their ownership. Encryption via HTTPS even through an VPN connection won’t protect your privacy as far as logs showing how you us the VPN go if that service logs activity and shares it with others. You ask this: “But I am very worried if ...


2

Some software is likely trafficking with the settings of the VPN, enabling the option of "Automatically use my Windows logon name and password", so that after a disconnection the VPN reconnects using the wrong credentials. The VPN settings file is a .pbk file found at: Current user: %AppData%\Microsoft\Network\Connections\Pbk All users: %...


2

In IPv4 you also have "subnet-directed broadcast". The last address of an IPv4 network is its broadcast address – from any other network, you can send packets to 192.168.2.255 and they will travel as unicast until they reach the 192.168.2.x network, then the router will convert them to broadcast. Your WoL tool should have an option to specify the ...


2

Can we set mozilla vpn on a router? Short answer, no you cannot. Longer answer follows. The way VPN works differs depending on what technology is used. Some VPN servers use an open standard which can be used to use standard clients, such as those build-in to windows itself. Other VPN servers use custom technology and require a VPN client to be used. Mozilla ...


2

Possibly, if your router allows the necessary software to be installed. The unofficial MozWire tool allows retrieving the WireGuard credentials from Mozilla VPN servers (which appear to be really just Mullvad VPN). After the signup is done, you can use a standard WireGuard client to connect.


2

You are apparently behind Carrier-grade NAT (CGN or CGNAT): With CGNAT, end sites, in particular residential networks, are configured with private network addresses that are translated to public IPv4 addresses by middlebox network address translator devices embedded in the network operator's network, permitting the sharing of small pools of public addresses ...


2

Some ways to avoid VPN blocks: Use your phone as hotspot Use the Tor Browser Use Shadowsocks (Chinese application, very popular in China for obvious reasons) Use Psiphon that lets you try multiple connection methods and protocols.


2

No, you cannot do this. You can only connect to the IP in the address ranges allotted to you by your ISP. Putting in an IP outside of the allowable range and not assigned to you, will result in an error. If one could just enter in any IP address they wanted, there would be no way for data to be routed to you.


2

So I did some research, and the problem seems to occur with multiple VPN clients, third party or not. From what I understood the problem is that by activating the VPN, some settings e.g. the proxy settings are altered, and that is something the average user must not do without granting admin rights to the process. I found out two possible workarounds, but I ...


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