New answers tagged

1

This comes from Windows 9x series, which didn't have SIDs or the 'SYSTEM' account, because it didn't have any local security enforcement in the first place. All processes always had full privileges. However, Windows 9x did have the ability to load different user profiles (per-user settings) and used the HKEY_USERS registry tree in a similar way. By default,...


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As a possible option try this Poswershell query: Get-ItemProperty HKLM:\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Uninstall\O365ProPlusRetail* | Select-Object DisplayName, DisplayVersion, Publisher


1

No need for 3rdP software, as suggested by arthur kamande. Nothing stops you from using SendKeys with PowerShell. Just convert the VBS to PowerShell code, as it's virtually the same. Example Powershell using SendKeys. [void] [System.Reflection.Assembly]::LoadWithPartialName("'Microsoft.VisualBasic") Start-Process -FilePath 'notepad.exe' [Microsoft....


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Easiest way to do it would just be a string replacement. I used this for a similar image path issue. if(($Temp.ImagePath -notlike "*`"*") -AND ($Temp.ImagePath -like "*.exe*")) ` { if($Temp.ImagePath -like "*D:\*") (repeat for "*C:\*") { $Temp.ImagePath = $Temp.ImagePath.Replace("D:\", "`"D:\") } $NewPath = $...


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I've noticed that "Automatically pick an accent color from my background" option leads to HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\DWM\ColorizationColorBalance getting a value 0xfffffff3 (i.e. it overrides an actual colorization color balance).


-3

There is another seemingly easier way to achieve this. You can just disable UAC (User Access Control) which was formerly known as LUA (Limited User Account). Beware that you are disabling UAC. It should not be a problem if you know what you are doing (since most of us here are developers, this should be no problem) Open regedit (Run->regedit) Navigate to ...


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Based on other comments this is not possible without native context handler. For C# this project https://github.com/dwmkerr/sharpshell can be used to create the native context handler.


1

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/win32/shell/handlers So a context menu extension runs before the menu is shown allowing it to show/hide itself. It also get told about double clicks on the file and can take over the Open verb if so configured. To see what you can do without programming see https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/win32/shell/...


2

Registry keys have a last-modified timestamp. You can use Regedit to export a key, selecting the ".txt" output format. That text file will contain the last modified date&time. NirSoft's RegScanner utility allows one to filter selected registry keys by ranges of the last-modified timestamp.


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There are a number of forensics-related scripts online that can help accomplish this. If you know the key(s) and there's a reasonable number, you can also export them to a .txt file in the registry editor. The LastWrite date/time will be there.


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You could try Nirsoft Shell View and export its items (select all for export). This could like result in conflicts, so I do not really recommend it. Better, I think, than format and reinstall would be to use the Microsoft Media Creation link to do a Repair Install. You could try Keep Everything and see if this resolves your issues. OR, you could keep just ...


0

The beet way on a Windows 10 system is to use PowerShell. Get-PnpDevice and Disable-PnpDevice are the Cmdlets you'll need. You must use an Administrative PowerShell Console Window. Get-PnpDevice returns all PNP devices: PS C:\> Get-PnpDevice Status Class ...


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Can you create Program Files x86 by yourself? First thing you should know about the x86 version of the Program Files folder. This folder only exists on 64-bit installations of Windows. Given that it is possible to install a 32-bit version of Windows, if you do so, no Program Files X86 will exists, and the Program Files folder will automatically be the one ...


2

I have lots of NAME NOT FOUND as well and there is nothing wrong with my computer. It is not deemed to be a critical issue. Several answers below to that effect. No need to worry. https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/ie/en-US/a2c2fd4d-e653-4348-8e84-997994958dab/is-name-not-found-result-by-process-monitor-a-critical-issue?forum=smallbusinessserver


0

Windows requires that these folders match the known installation locations, as shown in the environment variables. For example, for the'x86 location, enter the following in CMD: echo %programfiles(x86)% You can change the location for system folders, but might get odd results if the Windows, User, Program Files, Program Files (x86) and ProgramData folders ...


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Windows only needs one Program Files and Program Files (x86). Even if you have two disks (I do on one machine) there is still just one PF and one PF (x86). No need for more. Let Windows create these and I recommend you not do it yourself


0

I'll add my two cents for anyone that might still be searching this up. There's a much simpler (and safer) way to accomplish more or less the same thing, you'll have any folder you want appear in "This PC" only it won't be under "Folders" but under "Network Locations". Navigate to "This PC", right click anywhere and select "Add a network location". You ...


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