33

I've spent quite some time recently looking into this problem. There are two topics to consider: What kind of WiFi network does a client see when they try to connect? How do all the routers, access points, repeaters, switches, etc. talk to each other? Let's start with topic 1: There seem to be three options: Assign a different SSID to each access point/...


12

Wi-Fi cannot be bridged to Ethernet. This is not a Windows limitation in any way. There’s a good explanation on why that is in the old OpenWrt wiki. Instead, you should use Internet Connection Sharing (ie. make your PC a router): Go to the Network Connections control panel (where you’re currently trying to create the bridge) Open your Wi-Fi connection’s ...


5

It is certainly possible to do what you ask. As a matter of fact, it is the default configuration for some range extenders, like the Tp-Link TL-WA850RE which I have installed at home. The same SSID is visible all over my house, and you switch seamlessly from one to the other. Besides, this is the standard configuration which you find in most places large ...


5

When configured for active WDS, all transmissions made to the other endpoint are done in 4-address mode. A side configured for active WDS can make the first transmission or it can wait for the other side to contact it first. When passive WDS mode is used, the device cannot make the initial contact. But when the other side contacts it, if the other side uses ...


5

Bridged mode doesn't do what you think it does: It provides a bridge between a wireless network (where it acts as a client) and wired network (via its LAN ports). It's for connecting wired-only devices to a wireless network (so that they are in the same broadcast domain, hence "bridged"). It does not necessarily work as a repeater. In theory, it could, but ...


4

In most cases, you want to use the Repeater Bridge option. This keeps all the systems on the same subnet -- it's basically a range-extender, with the unlikely-to-affect you issues of MAC filtering already raised. You should not bother using MAC filtering as a security measure (it's useless, provides no security compared with WPA and any hacker can spoof a ...


4

But how do I setup the router? Do I use a range extender that can act as a router? Neither – this has absolutely nothing to do with routing of IP packets. Conceptually, most home "wireless routers" are 3-in-1 devices: an IP router, an Ethernet (wired LAN) switch, and a Wi-Fi access point. To add more LAN ports, you'd simply connect a second external ...


3

According to KVM's docs, it is not possible to use a bridge with a wireless NIC. I do not know the reason why even though I used to bridge the guest on VirtualBox. I have spent some few hours to figure out how to connect the guest to the host's wireless network and I found out the easiest way to do it is using a TAP device. The only disadvantage of this ...


3

Most Access Points are suitable for you! Just configure them as "Client", and connect the AP to the device with a crossover cable. Example with linksys: Linksys KB


3

I had exactly the same requirement as Zvika. By the way, his post on the subject is excellent. The alternative I found is this: configure a routed network in KVM in the range 192.168.1.160/28 (so, dedoimedo third solution, the "dirty hack") and then, instead of creating an ARP proxy the Zvika's way, I used parprouted, which is available in Ubuntu/Mint as a ...


3

You can run into issues with setup like this. I have router and 3 extenders. The side effect is that the extender might not always take the router as source and can therefor end up being not functional or running at low performance. In my case it was connecting like this: Router -> extender -> extender -> extender This resulted in very bad performance for ...


3

Yes, very possible. Set up the second wireless router in bridge mode — it then becomes an extension of your LAN (two routers, one LAN). Then connect the clients by Ethernet to the second wireless router. Many routers do this out of the box, otherwise, you can use alternative firmware to get the functionality (e.g. DD-WRT — instructions and schematic). An ...


3

https://www.intel.in/content/www/in/en/support/articles/000023257/network-and-i-o/wireless-networking.html The following Intel Wireless Adapters do not support soft AP and ad-hoc features that implement the new Windows 10 WDI model (driver version 18.30 or later): Intel® Wireless-AC 9560 Intel® Wireless-AC 9462 Intel® Wireless-AC 9461 Intel® Wireless-AC ...


3

You shouldn't use the same network on two different interfaces. The most simple setup would be using different nets (even a small /30 net) for both Pis. If you really want one network, you have two options: bridging: you can create a bridge device on the PC and add both interfaces to the bridge. Now you have to add your IP to the bridge (dhcp or static) ...


3

Vince, You need the second router in wireless bridge mode. This is how you do it. First of all, it will make this easier if you plug directly into the second router while configuring it. In the second routers configuration page go to the setup tab. Put the second router at the end of the first routers sub-net. example: 192.168.1.254 /24 Put it in DHCP ...


3

Although you have accepted the other answer as correct, it infact is not correct. There is third party firmware available for this device. It as far as I could find, has no support through dd-wrt to do what you want. It does however have firmware support for openWRT. I don't have this device, so I can't claim what kind of compatibility it actually has. ...


2

Yes the only way to connect them together is with a cable if they will not be compatible with each other for wireless bridging. You will need to do the following: Turn OFF DHCP Server on the B683, once they are connected together the B970b will do all the DHCP work Make sure the IP address for the B683 is in the same range as the network for the B970b and ...


2

You must disable internet connection sharing on bout connections. Go to Start→Control Panel→Network and Sharing Center. Change adapter settings -> and for Lan and Wi-fi do this just opposite! 1 or 2. So you need to uncheck "Allow other network users to connect through this computer's Internet connection check box".


2

"bridging is prohibited between the AP adapter and any other adapters in the system" https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/dd815243(v=vs.85).aspx


2

What you are trying to accomplish cannot be realized with any wireless card. Your card must be able to support AP mode; you may determine whether your card is suitable for the task by issuing the command iw list and searching its output for something similar to this: Supported interface modes: * IBSS * managed * AP ...


2

The official documentation is way too pessimistic. As always, someone smart has figured it out: you find the (lengthy) instructions to do this here. I tried it, it's a cinch. Edit: I am not sure why the first solution posted in the articled referenced above does not work for you, it did for me and you provide no extra information. Still, you may wish to ...


2

Found this: Netgear DGN1000-100NAS N150 Wireless ADSL1+ Modem Router has a hidden menu for changing the device to Bridge Mode. By default, the modem is set to 192.168.0.1. To access the hidden menu: 192.168.0.1/setup.cgi?next_file=mode.htm OR 192.168.0.1/mode.htm


2

What you are looking for is a Wireless Bridge. A device such as this Netgear connects as a client to your existing Wireless Adapter and acts as a bridge to the ethernet cabled device. There are a lot of different makes and models and some are called wireless game adapters for consoles that only had ethernet such as the earlier Xbox 360s.


2

Nope. WPS need to be supported by both device for it to work. You have to configure your wireless bridge so it does not use WPS. WPS (Wireless Protected Setup) is orthogonal to bridging. It is just a security mechanism that wraps WPA2 into something aimed to be more user friendly. If you do not use WPS, you can still configure WPA2 manually. As for the ...


2

I've never used this particular device, but I am familiar with wireless bridges (and have used a few) Yes, your server will get the IP in the same subnet as the other computers (provided its set up as a bridge) Yes, you can port-forward in your router. A bridge is like a switch, ie sits below the TCP/IP layer, so this will work fine. A bridge will slow ...


2

It is not "wireless adapter" doesn't support bridging. It is access point and WiFi host-to-ap protocol. When you establish connection you authenticate your adapter's MAC. The protocol has a space for three MACs: immediate authenticated participants and third - for any end point behind AP. So WiFi mobile station could send packet to any MAC, but only use its ...


2

1. Factory reset First factory reset the WL-330 device. Go to the WL-330 web admin interface, tab "Toolbox" -> tab "Back-up" -> label "Restore to Factory default" choose the [ Reset ] button. In case you can't access the web admin interface, you can also press the "Reset" button (on the rear panel of the device) ...


2

There are a few wireless USB hubs out there but they don't work very well. Toshiba made a wireless version of their DynaDock port replicator but it looks like that has been discontinued: Toshiba Dynadock Wireless U Universal USB Docking Station There is another one by Iogear that is available for purchase on Amazon: IOGEAR Wireless 4-Port USB Sharing ...


2

The AP has the setting to "Don't Broadcast SSID" enabled. So the normal beacons are sent out, as all APs must do, but they just don't include the SSID. The laptop should have the SSID as one of the one it knows, and when faced with a NULL ssid, it should send a PROBE with the SSID it wants to connect to. If this matches the SSID in the AP, they can ...


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