61

Good question! Basically the smartphone can't transmit a very powerful signal, but a router can "hear" a much weaker signal. Wireless communication waves don't have a hard cutoff line, they just become weaker or more distorted over distance. The more powerful a transmitter is, the farther the signal is strong enough for other devices to pick up. ...


29

You've got a 400Mbps fire hose from your modem to the Internet and a 700Mbps fire hose from your router to your wireless clients, but you've only got a 100Mbps drinking straw between the modem and the router. That drinking straw in between can't keep either fire hose full. Upgrade to a router with gigabit Ethernet.


25

The range of a wireless link is defined by the link budget. The link budget takes into account: The transmitter power, antenna gain, and losses The loss over the air (free space path loss) and through any obstacles The receiver's antenna gain, losses, and sensitivity Image Source So the max distance depends on both the transmitter and receiver. Of course, ...


20

It may be possible that some device has assumed a wrong IP address, so that you might have two devices with the same IP. This might cause problems, especially if that IP address belongs to a switch or some gateway. You could disconnect all the devices on switch #3, to see if the problem still arrives. If the problem has disappeared, reconnect them one-by-one ...


15

Yes. By turning off dhcp and wan but leaving the WIFI on you are in effect turning it into an access point. You will likely want to move its management IP to something other then the default, and make sure its in the same subnet as the new routers LAN range, and as you stated ensure DHCP is off. If your new router includes WIFI, if you have same SSID and ...


13

This sounds very much like a routing loop, ie switch 3 has more then 1 path to the router - maybe a direct connection and a connection vua another switch? You can diagnose this problem by tracing the connections from switch3 back to the other end. A lazier way, which might not work as well would be to discomnect everything from switch 3 and gradually re-add ...


12

Yes, there are chips that are specifically targeted for use in an AP (note: what laypeople and marketers call a "wireless router" is an AP that includes router functionality), and there are chips that are specifically targeted for use in a wireless client station, and there are also chips that are designed to serve in either role. If you browse the ...


12

Who expects radios of any sort to work without antennas attached? A better question might be why Wi-Fi worked at all in that state. Wi-Fi uses a lot more transmit power, so it's better able to make up for the extreme attenuation that comes from not having any antenna connected. Not only does Bluetooth use a lot less power, but modern Bluetooth audio uses all ...


10

Additional factor is power - a mains-powered router has no battery management requirements. By comparison a cellphone has to balance power usage by the wireless radio, cellular radio, CPU and rest of system. The two different radios are in use at the same time, forwarding data received in one and sent out the other. My phone's battery lasts a significantly ...


10

You need to set up the device you're calling your "Wi-Fi router" to act as a simple Wi-Fi AP instead of acting as a router. Some wireless router devices allow you to disable their NAT gateway and DHCP server features, and will automatically make their WAN Ethernet port act like a LAN Ethernet port. Others don't have this option, but you can still ...


8

I'll only answer this part first: is it impractical to expect a seamless connection from a load-balancer? (E.g. No dropped frames in a video call even when one of the ISPs goes off). If so, is there a better alternative? With a basic "load balancer" this is very difficult to achieve as far as I know, simply because each of the 3 ISPs requires you ...


7

I think with these two components you could achieve that: Connect Raspberry Pi to your computer using a crossover ethernet cable. This cable will make sure that the sending/receiving works properly even on similar devices (ie when you don't have a switch<->computer scenario). EDIT: As various people pointed out in the comments, this is only needed ...


7

@Spiff answer is generally the best one (and I upvoted it). If you do have some reason you need to have two separate networks joined together, there is an alternative - Change the netmask for the LAN on each router to 255.255.255.0 if its not set to that already. Assign the Wi-Fi router WAN interface a static IP address. You can either do this as a DHCP ...


6

Is there a way to switch between ethernet and WIFI connections without losing connection? Not in practice. The "connection" between Firefox and the remote server means that there is a local port on your local address, bound to a remote port on the server address. The "local address" is bound to the network device, and you cannot (easily) ...


6

Please refer to the following steps: Go to your Netgear admin panel and craft your beautiful emoji-enriched SSID. Open up the developer console. Override the validation function by typing in window.checkData = function() { return true; } (and then pressing Return) Craft emoji-enriched SSID. Save. For more details, please refer to the following link: ...


6

The internet comes from your modem with 400Mbit/s and goes in through the WAN port of your router which is a 100Mbit/s port. This limits the rest of the path to your client to 100Mbit/s max speed. That the WiFi hardware in the router is capable of up to 700Mbit/s speeds can still make sense though, you can utilize those speeds on your LAN, internally, you ...


5

Each time I replaced my Wifi hotspot but used the same name as before, Windows recognized it as a new/different hotspot with a name that collided with the old name, so they would throw a "1" or "2", etc. on the end of the ProfileName so that they're unique. This is what's being described here, and I finally found out how to fix it. I ...


5

Event though the OP found a workaround for his problem and closed this issue, he did not find the root issue. The fact that Docker's default bridged network bridge is connected to the internet and airflowsetup_default is not suggests that something is wrong with Docker networking setup. I did some research and it turns Fedora 32 decided it doesn't really ...


5

I have just done this in my house. I have a new router with a few devices connected (both wired and wireless), and I have my old router wired to it and set up as an access point, with additional devices connected to it (both wired and wireless). Besides changing the settings on the old router to work as an access point, I also had to connect the cable coming ...


5

They will need to be reconnected manually. This isn't a theoretical question or answer, they will disconnect as soon as they miss enough beacon/management frames from the access point. This behavior will be the same across all 802.11 capable devices. It's not that the AP has disappeared when you change the SSID, but it's identifying information has changed ...


5

Depending on the Raspberry PI OS you’re going to use, you can just slap a wpa_supplicant.conf on the boot partition and the OS will detect and use it to connect to a wireless network. Raspbian for example supports this. The file could look like this: country=us ctrl_interface=DIR=/var/run/wpa_supplicant GROUP=netdev update_config=1 network={ scan_ssid=1 ...


4

I recommend you to switch to iwd as a replacement for wpa_supplicant if WiFi speeds are important to you, as disabling 802.11n (as recommended in the other answer with the 11n_disable option) may cause a decrease in network performance in 2.4GHz networks that support 802.11n. I got this to work on my HP Elitebook 1030 running Manjaro GNOME and am very glad I ...


4

What you’re looking for is bridged mode. That way, whatever traffic arrives via the optical network is pushed out unaltered (except sometimes VLAN filtered) on the Ethernet side and vice versa. Not all routers support this. You cannot always enable it yourself, the ISP may have to do it. Your ISP may use some proprietary authentication scheme (other than ...


4

When my ISP says my internet speed is 50mbps, does that mean each device I have in my household can receive up to 50mbps at once, or does that mean the sum total all the devices is up to 50mbps? It is a combination of all devices used on the same network will one device using the internet intensively affect the internet speed test results of another device ...


4

The simple answer to this is yes, with time it will be just as bad as 2.4Ghz. The 5Ghz band was underutilized in most areas here for the better part of a decade. When wireless-a was first released the channels were 20Mhz wide. This allowed for 9 non-overlapping channels in the 5.8Ghz band (uni1). This was quite a bit more than the three non-overlapping ...


4

Yes. This is perfectly normal. Both the WiFi and the Ethernet devices are completely separate devices and has its own configuration and network address. They will have different MAC addresses as well. Your router has no idea that two completely different network devices are actually the same computer, it shouldn't need to care. The only issue may come if you ...


4

Please create a System Restore save point before doing any of the advice from below, to be able to rollback to your current state in case of a problem. The free Driver Store Explorer can help to delete drivers: Run as Administrator Click on Enumerate Find the driver in the list and check-mark to select Select "Force deletion" and click on "...


4

That antenna is for point to point connections, up to a couple miles. It creates a tightly focused beam pattern that isn't going to help you in a home/soho scenario. The general rule for wifi antennas: the higher the dbi rating, the more directional the radiation pattern. I wouldn't recommend taking out an antenna from the phase array and using a directional ...


3

The other answer here is technically correct on "it will allow your device to connect to either (if both of them are broadcasting from the same location)", but there is a subtle detail here and the actual result is probably not what you hope 2 same SSID would do in the first place. The actual outcome is: Your devices do not seem to be able to roam ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible