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1

It's hard to know the antenna design for that router without seeing much more detailed technical information that most vendors don't publish. The two external stick antennas may be WLAN-only (Wi-Fi-only), and the WWAN (4G) antenna may be internal. Unless you can learn the details of the antenna configuration of your router, your question is not answerable.


1

The main issue in populated areas is that there are too many routers sending WLAN signals, which leads to Wi-Fi interception, especially if you're using 2.4GHz signal(wider scope and more crowded than 5GHz). Most routers auto-change the channel they are transmitting data through, and changing the channel manually isn't a solution. The best remedy is to ...


0

Oddly enough, it appears this was a hardware problem: I noticed the NUC's WiFi adapter would connect briefly before quitting. As a workaround, I got a USB WiFi b/g/n dongle and plugged it in. Voila, reliable connection. Move along, nothing to see here...


0

The DHCP info clearly shows that your router is 192.168.254.254 and supplying DHCP, DNS and is the default gateway. It supplies the 192.168.254.0/24 network to its clients. If you want to do manual assignments of the ipv4 address you will have to use an address in the same range (and which is not part of the DHCP pool) or it won't work. 192.168.1.101 is ...


1

I would echo suggestions to use a single subnet method by connecting your Wi-Fi router via LAN port instead of WAN port to the wired segment of your network (and disable DHCP on the Wi-Fi router). This will keep Wi-Fi devices on the 192.168.0.x subnet, thereby avoiding routing. Generally speaking, that would simplify things. But if you insist on keeping two ...


7

@Spiff answer is generally the best one (and I upvoted it). If you do have some reason you need to have two separate networks joined together, there is an alternative - Change the netmask for the LAN on each router to 255.255.255.0 if its not set to that already. Assign the Wi-Fi router WAN interface a static IP address. You can either do this as a DHCP ...


10

You need to set up the device you're calling your "Wi-Fi router" to act as a simple Wi-Fi AP instead of acting as a router. Some wireless router devices allow you to disable their NAT gateway and DHCP server features, and will automatically make their WAN Ethernet port act like a LAN Ethernet port. Others don't have this option, but you can still ...


1

Yes, it is possible, but not with all the functionality of third-party firmware such as "DD-WRT". From my experience/ignorance WPA2 not supported does not necessarily mean that it will not work. Having recently set up a Client Bridge on a DD-WRT enabled router, I thought I would see what I could do with the old TD-W8968v1 that I had lying around. I ...


1

I was having the same issue as you. My PC was connected directly to my router. However, all other devices including my Mycloud EX 4100 were connected to the Deco Mesh network (192.168.68.XX) You need to be on the same LAN as the Mycloud device in order to access it. Solution I used: I connected a switch to the Main Deco unit that is connected to the router....


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